Moon Cakes * Mid Autumn Festival

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Chinese people celebrate the Mid-Autumn festival with many traditional and meaningful activities, such as eating dinner with family, hanging lanterns, guessing lantern riddles, and worshiping the moon.

Since 2008, Mid-Autumn Festival has been a 3-day public holiday in mainland China. In 2017, the holiday will be October 1–8, combining the National Day holiday and a three weekend days.

 

A moon cake is a traditional Chinese pastry. It is made from wheat flour and sweet stuffing, such as sugar and lotus seed powder.

It’s a symbol of family reunion, and the cake is traditionally cut into pieces that equal the number of people in the family..

Eating moon cakes is the most common and representative tradition of the day. In ordinary times, people won’t buy or eat moon cakes but during the Mid-Autumn Festival everyone will have a moon cake to celebrate.

Mooncakes typically measure around 5 to 10 cm (2 to 4 inches) across and up to 5 cm (2 inches) deep. Most mooncakes have a pastry skin enveloping a sweet, dense filling.

Easy Recipe to make (non traditional )

1/4 cup sugar

2 egg yolks

1/2 cup salted butter

1 cup all-purpose flour

1 cup strawberry jam ( bean curried is a common filing)

Make the Dough -Refrigerate and chill -Roll in to small balls and make whole with thumb-fill with choice of filling. Brush with egg white. Bake at 375 for29 minutes.

This is a fun way to introduce kids to the history and culture of China.

Most Asian Markets Sell traditional Moon cakes  to enjoy & Share.

 

Moon cakes Symbolize Family Reunion

In Chinese culture, roundness symbolizes completeness and togetherness. A full moon symbolizes prosperity and reunion for the whole family. Round moon cakes complement the harvest moon in the night sky at the Mid-Autumn Festival.

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In these charming volumes, Little Mei asks her grandfather about each of the four different Chinese celebrations represented.

He tells her the stories of Nian and the monster Xi (Chinese New Year); Qu Yuan, a patriotic poet who loved his kingdom (Dragon Boat Festival); the Jade Emperor of Heaven who ordered the earth to be destroyed by fire (Lantern Festival); and Hou Yi who shot down the suns (Mid-Autumn Festival).

In Celebrating the Mid-Autumn Festival Little Mei wants to know why her family members have all come together this evening. Grandpa tells her the story of Hou Yi who shot down the suns and his wife, Chang’e, who floats to the moon. Includes a quick recipe for moon cakes.

 

Thursday Food Find will have more great Customs and Food-  Lisa

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