Memorial Day Flag Etiquette

With Memorial Day Monday I thought I would post about Flag etiquette .

Flag Etiquette

Memorial Day :

The flag is flown at half-staff only until noon on Memorial Day.  Other days that the President proclaims that the flag be flown at half-staff include:  May 15, Peace Officers Memorial Day; September 11, Patriot Day; and December 7, National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day.

Specific guidance is found in the U.S. Code, which instructs that any time a flag is flown at half-staff, it “should be first hoisted to the peak for an instant and then lowered to the half-staff position.”

Displaying the Flag Outdoors

When the flag is displayed from a staff projecting from a window, balcony, or a building, the union should be at the peak of the staff unless the flag is at half staff.

When it is displayed from the same flagpole with another flag – of a state, community, society or Scout unit – the flag of the United States must always be at the top except that the church pennant may be flown above the flag during church services for Navy personnel when conducted by a Naval chaplain on a ship at sea.

When the flag is displayed over a street, it should be hung vertically, with the union to the north or east. If the flag is suspended over a sidewalk, the flag’s union should be farthest from the building.

When flown with flags of states, communities, or societies on separate flag poles which are of the same height and in a straight line, the flag of the United States is always placed in the position of honor – to its own right.
..The other flags may be smaller but none may be larger.
..No other flag ever should be placed above it.
..The flag of the United States is always the first flag raised and the last to be lowered.

When flown with the national banner of other countries, each flag must be displayed from a separate pole of the same height. Each flag should be the same size. They should be raised and lowered simultaneously. The flag of one nation may not be displayed above that of another nation.

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