Butter Milk Biscuit Day

Can there be anany more Southern hoiday!Today I am celebrating my Grandma buttermilk biscuit fresh from the oven . I can still smell the aroma as she pulled them from the oven. So come have some with me this morning! Lisa

  • 1/2 cup butter (1 stick), frozen
  • 2 1/2 cups self-rising flour
  • 1 cup chilled buttermilk
  • Parchment paper
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted

Preheat oven to 475°. Grate frozen butter using large holes of a box grater. Toss together grated butter and flour in a medium bowl. Chill 10 minutes.

Make a well in center of mixture. Add buttermilk, and stir 15 times. Dough will be sticky.

Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Lightly sprinkle flour over top of dough. Using a lightly floured rolling pin, roll dough into a 3/4-inch-thick rectangle (about 9 x 5 inches). Fold dough in half so short ends meet. Repeat rolling and folding process 4 more times.

Roll dough to 1/2-inch thickness. Cut with a 2 1/2-inch floured round cutter, reshaping scraps and flouring as needed.

Place dough rounds on a parchment paper-lined jelly-roll pan. Bake at 475° for 15 minutes or until lightly browned. Brush with melted butter.

From the kitchens of our grandmothers to present-day biscuit-only shops, this sweet and savory food has come a long way in American culture.https://www.amazon.com/Biscuits-Southern-Recipes-All-American-Kitchen-ebook/dp/B00W0LW68G/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=biscuits+cookbook&qid=1557842991&s=gateway&sr=8-3

More than four hundred years ago, explorers of the New World carried a biscuit known as hardtack on their voyages. Hardtack was made from flour, water, and sometimes salt and was sturdy and long lasting, making it suitable for hard, treacherous journeys. The composition and texture of the hardtack biscuit changed at the hands of the Jamestown settlers, who had access to three necessary ingredients that would transform the difficult-to-bite and bland tasting hardtack into a soft, delicious biscuit: soft winter wheat, fat in the form of lard from pigs, and milk or buttermilk from cows.

Today’s version of biscuits barely resembles its predecessor. Our preference is for soft, billowy, flaky, and delicious biscuits that can be eaten alone, used as a vehicle for fillings and toppings, or incorporated as an ingredient in a recipe. While biscuits are wildly popular in our culture, they are known to intimidate home cooks. Jackie Garvin overcame her decades long biscuit-making failures by research and trial and error and has emerged to write a cookbook that simplifies and demystifies biscuit baking and highlights the prevalence of biscuits throughout the United States.

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