Thursday Food post

Guinness Beer and Ribs

 

Guinness-original-logo.svg

From- Wikipedia

Guinness (/ˈɡɪns/) is an Irish dry stout that originated in the brewery of Arthur Guinness (1725–1803) at St. James’s Gate brewery in the capital city of Dublin, Ireland. Guinness, produced by the Diageo beverages company, is one of the most successful beer brands worldwide. It is brewed in almost 50 countries and is available in over 120.[1][2] Annual sales total of Guinness in 2011 was 850 million litres (220,000,000 US gal).[1]

Guinness features a burnt flavour that is derived from roasted, unmalted barley, although this is a relatively modern development, not becoming part of the grist until the mid-20th century. For many years, a portion of aged brew was blended with freshly brewed beer to give a sharp lactic flavour. Although Guinness’s palate still features a characteristic “tang”, the company has refused to confirm whether this type of blending still occurs. The draught beer‘s thick, creamy head comes from mixing the beer with nitrogen and carbon dioxide when poured.[3] It is popular with the Irish, both in Ireland and abroad. In spite of declining consumption since 2001,[4] it is still the best-selling alcoholic drink in Ireland[5][6] where Guinness & Co. Brewery makes almost €2 billion worth of the beverage annually.

The company was started in 1759 in Dublin, but had to move its headquarters to London at the beginning of the Anglo-Irish Trade War in 1932. In 1997, Guinness plc merged with Grand Metropolitan to form the multinational alcoholic drinks producer Diageo.

Recipe for Ribs

– Recipe from Guinness- link

lbs 6 oz. pork ribs, on the bone

3 1/5 tbsp. olive oil

4/5 cup plain flour

2 medium onions, finely diced

2 clove garlic, chopped

2 sticks of celery, finely chopped

2 bay leaves

3 sprigs of thyme

2 bottles of Guinness® Foreign Extra Stout

2 cups beef stock

Sea salt & freshly cracked black pepper

PREP TIME20 MINS
COOKING TIME3
SERVES4-6

In a heavy based saucepan, heat the oil. Dust the ribs lightly in the flour, shaking off any excess flour. Seal the ribs on all sides, remove and place on a plate. Do this in batches so not to crowd the pan. Turn down the heat and add the onions, celery, garlic, thyme and bay leaves and sweat until softened but not colored. Deglaze the saucepan with a little of the Guinness® Foreign Extra Stout and add the browned ribs back into the pan. Add the remaining Guinness and beef stock and season to taste with the salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and cover and cook over a low heat for 3 hours. Once the ribs are cooked and the meat is falling off the bone, carefully remove the ribs with a slotted spoon and place in a serving dish. Turn the heat up on the saucepan and reduce the sauce until you have about a pint of liquid remaining. Pour the sauce over the ribs and serve.

Another Way- 

 

Image result for guinness beer recipes ribs
Deglaze the saucepan with a little of the Guinness® Foreign ExtraStout and add the browned ribs back into the pan. Add the remainingGuinness and beef stock and season to taste with the salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and cover and cook over a low heat for 3 hours.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s